| Posted On May 14, 2015 | By:

The Top 6 Issues Women Bring to Their Doctor

At the recent bi-annual Women’s Health Forum hosted by the Mass Health Council, I was asked to review the top five health issues that women bring to me as their primary care physician. I couldn’t narrow it down to only five, so I came up with six – here they are!

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| Posted On Nov 20, 2014 | By:

Anxiety in Overdrive

If a world existed where we all happily chilled on a beach day in and day out, we would probably never feel anxious, but we would also never get anything done. The reality is that many of us have a lot to do each day, and a little anxiety can sometimes motivate us to get it done.

However, there is a fine line between anxiety pushing you to meet or exceed the demands on your plate and being so anxious about them that you cannot work efficiently,

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| Posted On Apr 17, 2013 | By:

Top 10 Questions Women Ask Their Primary Care Doctor, Part 2

About two weeks ago, I published the first 4 of the top 10 questions women ask their primary care doctor.  Here is part 2, which contains the next 3 questions – #6 – 4, as I’m counting down to the top 3.

I stressed this in the first post but do not want the message to get lost: whatever questions you may have for your doctor or any of your primary care providers about your body or your health,

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| Posted On Jan 30, 2012 | By:

What You Should Know About Your Thyroid

Do you know what your thyroid is? Do you know where in your body it is located, or what it does? If you answered “no” to any or all of these questions, you are far from alone. Many people know little to nothing about this small but extremely critical gland.

According to the American Thyroid Association, an estimated 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease and more than 12 percent of the U.S.

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| Posted On Jul 19, 2011 | By:

Answers to some Common Questions about Health Screening Tests

I’m healthy and scheduled a checkup.  What “routine” blood tests do I need?

Surprisingly, few blood tests are recommended on a “routine” or screening basis.  Everyone should have their cholesterol levels (a “lipid profile”) checked at least every five years, even if it’s normal.  Your doctor or nurse will request that you do this fasting, meaning nothing to eat or drink for about 8-12 hours beforehand  (water, black coffee,

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