| Posted On May 27, 2021 | By:

Seasonal Superfoods

Spring is my favorite time of the year. The days are getting longer, the sun is stronger, winter is definitely over, and summer is on its way! It’s the perfect time of year to work on healthy habits like exercising more and eating better.

If you’ve been to the grocery store lately, you might have noticed that the produce department is brimming with fresh tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries, and even corn on the cob. 

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| Posted On Aug 15, 2018 | By:

Keeping Your Vision as You Age

There are some things about aging that are inevitable. Your hearing decreases with age, and while limiting exposure to loud sounds can prevent some loss, you cannot prevent it all. Therefore, it might seem logical to assume that your ability to see 20/20 would also decrease with age, but this is not necessarily the case! If you cannot see at 20/20 vision, regardless of age, your eye doctor should determine why. Decreased vision can happen due to changes that occur anywhere from the front of the eye (cornea) to the inside back of the eye (retina) or by changes in the visual system of the brain.

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| Posted On May 19, 2015 | By:

Does Everyone Need an Eye Exam?

Many people believe that an eye exam only evaluates your eyesight, so if you recently passed the RMV’s vision test or another vision screening, you don’t need to see an eye doctor, right?

Nope. An eye exam is much more than checking your vision and prescribing eyeglasses or contact lenses.

Thorough eye exams are important for detecting vision problems and also for assessing your overall health. A thorough eye exam can detect a number of serious medical conditions,

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| Posted On Feb 17, 2012 | By:

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD) is a disease associated with aging that causes vision loss in the center of your vision.  The disease affects the center of the retina called the macula.  The retina is the light sensitive tissue which lines the back of the eye like the film in the back of a camera.  The macula is used for fine central vision such as reading, recognizing faces, and recognizing colors.  Any damage to the macula may have a profound effect on one’s central vision and daily functioning. 

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