| Posted On Jan 02, 2019 | By:

Six Lifestyle Changes to Reduce Blood Pressure

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology released new guidelines for diagnosing and treating high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in late 2017. These most recent guidelines recommend that blood pressure should now be treated when it is higher than 130/80, rather than the previous 140/90. Under these new guidelines, it’s estimated that half of the U.S. population has high blood pressure.

High blood pressure, often referred to as the “silent killer,” often has no warning signs or symptoms.

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| Posted On Jul 17, 2018 | By:

Eating Right for Healthy Kidneys

Have you ever stopped to think how important your kidneys are to long-term health? Kidneys are vital organs that usually fly under the radar when we think about a healthy lifestyle. Many key functions in our body depend upon our kidneys including:

  • Removing waste and extra fluid as urine
  • Balancing electrolytes, like sodium and potassium
  • Producing red blood cells
  • Regulating blood pressure
  • Controlling pH balance
  • Making an active form of Vitamin D to support bone health

Nearly 1 in 7 Americans have chronic kidney disease (CKD),

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| Posted On Sep 10, 2015 | By:

Blood Pressure by the Numbers

119/79, 120/80, 140/90. No, these aren’t the winning lotto numbers, but they are numbers you should remember. They are key in understanding your blood pressure reading and they represent very real and very important facts about your health.

Blood pressure, by definition, measures the force pushing outwards on your arterial walls. As your heart pumps blood throughout the body, it pushes the blood up against the walls of the blood vessels;

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| Posted On Feb 11, 2014 | By:

Give Your Heart Some Love, Too!

Since Valentine’s Day is this Friday and February is American Heart Month, I thought it only appropriate to write about the most important way you can show your heart a little extra love. Heart disease is the number 1 killer of Americans, and many of the risk factors for this disease are diet and lifestyle-related and largely preventable. The American Heart Association urges everyone to follow a Heart Healthy Diet in order to reduce your risk,

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