| Posted On Mar 24, 2022 | By:

Learning How to Live With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition that causes high levels of sugar, or glucose, in the bloodstream. This happens when the body is unable to produce or use insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone created by the pancreas. Insulin acts like a set of keys that attaches to the body’s cells and allows glucose to enter where it can be used for fuel. About 11% of Americans have some form of diabetes.

Types of Diabetes

All types of diabetes can lead to high levels of sugar in the blood.

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| Posted On Apr 28, 2021 | By:

Prediabetes? Now is the Best Time To Make a Change

Are you are one of the almost 80 million Americans who have been diagnosed with prediabetes? If so, consider it a warning sign. It’s important to make changes as soon as you can to help prevent or slow the development of diabetes.

Most people who develop Type 2 diabetes start with prediabetes, also known as impaired fasting blood sugar. Fasting blood sugar levels are elevated, between 100 and 125mg/dl, and Hemoglobin A1c 5.7-6.4%,

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| Posted On Feb 07, 2014 | By:

EKGs and exercise stress tests When you need them for heart disease—and when you don’t

If you have chest pain or other symptoms of heart disease, an electrocardiogram (EKG) or exercise stress test can be lifesaving. The same is true if you have a history of heart disease or are at very high risk for it. But in other cases, you should think twice. Here’s why:

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| Posted On Aug 29, 2012 | By:

Diabulimia: a Dangerous Eating Disorder

The promise of quick weight loss is appealing to many, especially young women who are concerned with their appearance.  Often, the quest for a thin body and an obsession with food can lead to eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia.  When an individual with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes develops an eating disorder, the result can be downright deadly.

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| Posted On Jul 19, 2011 | By:

Answers to some Common Questions about Health Screening Tests

I’m healthy and scheduled a checkup.  What “routine” blood tests do I need?

Surprisingly, few blood tests are recommended on a “routine” or screening basis.  Everyone should have their cholesterol levels (a “lipid profile”) checked at least every five years, even if it’s normal.  Your doctor or nurse will request that you do this fasting, meaning nothing to eat or drink for about 8-12 hours beforehand  (water, black coffee,

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