| Posted On May 04, 2021 | By:

Seasonal Allergies, the Common Cold, or COVID-19?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a cough, sneeze, sore throat, or congested nose might trigger heightened anxiety. However, it’s important to remember that despite the many precautions we are taking during this pandemic, seasonal allergies and the common cold still exist. While some symptoms do overlap, there are a few key differences between allergies, the common cold, and a COVID-19 infection to keep in mind when assessing your symptoms.

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| Posted On Nov 12, 2015 | By:

Have Trouble Swallowing? It Could Be Allergies

Eosinophilic esophagitis (e-o-sin-o-FILL-ik uh-sof-uh-JIE-tis), or EoE, is a relatively new diagnosis for a chronic, allergic inflammatory condition of the esophagus. Because the symptoms of EoE can mimic those of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), it can go undiagnosed.

Patients with EoE have a large number of eosinophils (a type of white blood cells) in the tissue of the esophagus. Eosinophils are common in the digestive tract, but an excessive buildup of these cells in the esophagus may be caused by a reaction to foods,

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| Posted On Jun 06, 2013 | By:

How to Use an Inhaler

If you’ve been diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) or asthma, your doctor may have prescribed an inhaler as part of your treatment plan. An inhaler is a handheld device that delivers medicine in a measured dose while a person inhales. Inhalers are used for respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD.

Inhaled medicine may work faster than oral medicines to relieve symptoms such as wheezing and spasms in the bronchial tubes,

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| Posted On May 01, 2012 | By:

Asthma Action Plans

Because asthma varies over time (sometimes symptoms are absent, sometimes symptoms are minimal, and at other times, asthma symptoms are bad), asthma action plans are very important.  When a child has an asthma action plan, he or his parents and care givers are able to increase or decrease his treatment based on his symptoms with the guidance of that plan.  Studies indicate that when children with asthma have an asthma action plan, they and their parents are better able to manage the ups and downs of their asthma.

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| Posted On Feb 24, 2012 | By:

Lung Function Testing in Children with Asthma

If you have a child with asthma, you probably know that their symptoms can vary for many reasons. One way to help assess your child’s asthma is a lung function test.  A lung function test (spirometry) evaluates how well your lungs work – how much air you can breathe in, how much air you can blow out and how quickly you can do it.  The test consists of breathing into a mouthpiece that is hooked up to a computer. 

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| Posted On Dec 15, 2011 | By:

The Importance of Planned-Care Visits for Asthma

Whether your child’s asthma is in good control or poor control makes a tremendous difference on your family’s quality of life and on your child’s overall health. 

  • When asthma is in poor control, children miss an average of 18 days of school versus only 0 to 2 days missed among children whose asthma is in good control. Children may fall behind when they miss school frequently, and parents may need to miss work during school absences.
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