Allergy and Asthma

| Posted On May 04, 2021 | By:

Seasonal Allergies, the Common Cold, or COVID-19?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a cough, sneeze, sore throat, or congested nose might trigger heightened anxiety. However, it’s important to remember that despite the many precautions we are taking during this pandemic, seasonal allergies and the common cold still exist. While some symptoms do overlap, there are a few key differences between allergies, the common cold, and a COVID-19 infection to keep in mind when assessing your symptoms.

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| Posted On Mar 08, 2021 | By:

Under Pressure: How to Avoid and Treat a Sinus Infection

Protecting yourself from a sinus infection is an essential part of maintaining respiratory health – particularly as we continue cold and flu season during the pandemic. Our respiratory system helps us breathe, allows our body to absorb oxygen for vital organ function, and cleans out waste gases such as carbon dioxide.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 31 million Americans experience sinus infections every year. While a sinus infection may seem like a minor ailment,

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| Posted On Nov 12, 2015 | By:

Have Trouble Swallowing? It Could Be Allergies

Eosinophilic esophagitis (e-o-sin-o-FILL-ik uh-sof-uh-JIE-tis), or EoE, is a relatively new diagnosis for a chronic, allergic inflammatory condition of the esophagus. Because the symptoms of EoE can mimic those of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), it can go undiagnosed.

Patients with EoE have a large number of eosinophils (a type of white blood cells) in the tissue of the esophagus. Eosinophils are common in the digestive tract, but an excessive buildup of these cells in the esophagus may be caused by a reaction to foods,

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| Posted On Apr 29, 2014 | By:

What to do about Seasonal Allergies

The month of April marks the beginning of seasonal allergies and the telltale sneezing, watery eyes, nasal congestion or pressure, and general malaise that start for millions of Americans.  Many people do not know what they’re allergic to and wonder if they should get tested to find out.  My general answer is that it depends on how severe your allergy symptoms are and what has or has not helped you to manage them in the past. 

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| Posted On Apr 10, 2014 | By:

Allergy tests: When you need them and when you don’t

Skin or blood tests, when combined with a doctor’s examination and your medical history, can help determine if you’re truly allergic to something you inhaled, touched, or ate. But if you don’t have symptoms or a medical evaluation that points to an allergy, you should think twice about testing. Here’s why:

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| Posted On Feb 27, 2014 | By:

Treating sinusitis: Don’t rush to antibiotics

Millions of people are prescribed antibiotics each year for sinusitis, a frequent complication of the common cold, hay fever, and other respiratory allergies. In fact, 15 to 21 percent of all antibiotic prescriptions for adults in outpatient care are for treating sinusitis. Unfortunately, most of those people probably don’t need the drugs. Here’s why:

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| Posted On Jun 06, 2013 | By:

How to Use an Inhaler

If you’ve been diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) or asthma, your doctor may have prescribed an inhaler as part of your treatment plan. An inhaler is a handheld device that delivers medicine in a measured dose while a person inhales. Inhalers are used for respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD.

Inhaled medicine may work faster than oral medicines to relieve symptoms such as wheezing and spasms in the bronchial tubes,

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