Behavioral Health

| Posted On Jan 26, 2021 | By:

Staying Connected to Others and Each Other

During the winter months, it continues to be important to stay connected to family and friends, either virtually or through proper physical distancing. This may be more challenging for children who have been taken out of their usual social interactions both in and out of school. It is expected that your child may have some apprehension or nervousness about reconnecting with friends and peers. However, finding ways to have safe social interaction is essential for their emotional well-being.

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| Posted On Jan 12, 2021 | By:

Jaw Pain: Temporary Stress or a Joint Disorder?

Balancing personal responsibilities, keeping up with loved ones, and staying healthy can be difficult, especially as we face the COVID-19 pandemic. For many people, it’s common for stress and anxiety to manifest through physical symptoms. Sometimes, this stress can cause you to clench or grind your teeth, which can lead to more serious issues if left untreated.

Teeth grinding or clenching, known as bruxism, is a common condition that affects the mouth,

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| Posted On Jan 07, 2021 | By:

The Benefits of Developing Routine and Structure

Routine and structure are a part of our daily life. For children and teenagers, having a predictable daily routine helps not only with organization but also with emotional regulation and behavioral control. Prior to the pandemic, we all had well-established routines in our daily lives. With the restrictions related to COVID-19, marked changes to these routines have occurred, and the familiar structure of school and work have shifted or disappeared.

It can feel challenging to know where to start or how to establish a structure or routine.

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| Posted On Jan 05, 2021 | By:

What Kind of Goals Would You Like to Achieve?

When it comes to setting goals, chances are you’ve heard about the importance of setting goals that are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. If you’re able to answer “yes” to each of the following questions, you’ll know you’ve set a SMART goal.

SMART Goals

Let’s go through an example. Say you’re interested in becoming more health-conscious, and you’d like to “eat a healthier diet.”

  • Specific – Does your goal use action words to state what you want to achieve and how you intend to achieve it?
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| Posted On Dec 15, 2020 | By:

Who Wears Masks? Superheroes!

Some kids are in school full-time or in a hybrid model, and some may be attending daycare while parents are working. Initially, the new normal of wearing a mask may have been a difficult process for them to understand. By now, most children are quite used to the experience. For those still struggling, it’s critical to validate their frustration and irritation while also gently yet firmly reminding them of the need to continue the practice of wearing a mask.

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| Posted On Dec 01, 2020 | By:

What’s Getting in the Way of Weight Loss?

As a psychologist who works with people struggling with weight issues, I spend a lot of time thinking about the relationship between emotions and food. If you have gained some extra pounds during the COVID pandemic, I have some suggestions about how to deal with weight gain based on your thoughts, feelings, and attitudes. Some ways we think about our weight and ourselves are helpful, but others can work against you.

Patients often tell me that they don’t see themselves as emotional eaters,

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| Posted On Dec 26, 2019 | By:

Our Top Health Blogs of 2019

As we look forward to a healthy 2020, we thought it was a good time to look back at some of our most popular health blog posts of 2019. Here’s a quick summary in case you happened to miss any of them!

Six Lifestyle Changes to Reduce Blood Pressure
If you are diagnosed with high blood pressure, your provider may prescribe medication to lower your blood pressure. It’s important that you take your medication regularly and as instructed.

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| Posted On Dec 03, 2019 | By:

Understanding and Getting Help for an Eating Disorder

Generally speaking, an eating disorder is an illness in which a person has an abnormal relationship with food and their body. There are various components of eating disorders, including both a behavioral (physical) element and a cognitive (mental) element. The physical part of the illness can include behaviors such as when someone actively restricts the number of calories they eat, or they overeat and then purge to attempt to avoid gaining weight. There is also the cognitive part of the disorder,

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| Posted On Aug 06, 2019 | By:

Improving the Health and Well-being of Our LGBTQ Children

We are making strides in our understanding that sexual identity, gender identity, and sexual orientation are not black and white but exist on a continuum. Supported by a growing body of medical research, science is proving that being LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer/Questioning) is not “a choice” or “a mental disorder” and cannot be changed through any means – it is who each person is intrinsically wired to be.

But sadly,

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| Posted On Apr 30, 2019 | By:

Recognizing Postpartum Anxiety and Panic

You may have seen television advertisements with images of new parents looking very worried about giving their baby their first bath or doing the first diaper change. If you’re new to parenting, being nervous is expected given that your new responsibilities are often unchartered territory.

But what happens if that nervousness turns into something more debilitating? Postpartum anxiety may impact up to 17% of postpartum women. It is increasingly being recognized as a prevalent and distressing perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD) that warrants separate attention from the better known postpartum depression.

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