| Posted On May 01, 2012 | By:

Asthma Action Plans

Because asthma varies over time (sometimes symptoms are absent, sometimes symptoms are minimal, and at other times, asthma symptoms are bad), asthma action plans are very important.  When a child has an asthma action plan, he or his parents and care givers are able to increase or decrease his treatment based on his symptoms with the guidance of that plan.  Studies indicate that when children with asthma have an asthma action plan, they and their parents are better able to manage the ups and downs of their asthma.

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| Posted On Feb 24, 2012 | By:

Lung Function Testing in Children with Asthma

If you have a child with asthma, you probably know that their symptoms can vary for many reasons. One way to help assess your child’s asthma is a lung function test.  A lung function test (spirometry) evaluates how well your lungs work – how much air you can breathe in, how much air you can blow out and how quickly you can do it.  The test consists of breathing into a mouthpiece that is hooked up to a computer. 

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| Posted On Dec 15, 2011 | By:

The Importance of Planned-Care Visits for Asthma

Whether your child’s asthma is in good control or poor control makes a tremendous difference on your family’s quality of life and on your child’s overall health. 

  • When asthma is in poor control, children miss an average of 18 days of school versus only 0 to 2 days missed among children whose asthma is in good control. Children may fall behind when they miss school frequently, and parents may need to miss work during school absences.
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