| Posted On Nov 14, 2012 | By:

Help for the Occasional Snorer

Sleeping in the same room with someone who snores can literally be exhausting. Occasional snoring, although a nuisance to those around you,  is usually not a serious problem. However, if your snoring is habitual, it is not only disrupting the sleep of others, but it also impairs your own sleep quality and can be an indication of a more serious medical condition. Just what causes snoring, what can you do to stop occasional snoring,

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| Posted On Nov 09, 2012 | By:

10 Tips to Trim the Fat from Thanksgiving Dinner

For most Americans, Thanksgiving marks the official start of the Holiday Feasting Season.  With the average Thanksgiving dinner weighing in at over 3,000 calories (most adults only need 1,500-2,000 calories per day), it’s no wonder most of us will roll into the New Year at least a few pounds heavier.  Holidays and weight gain don’t have to be synonymous, however, if you do some advance planning and make smart choices at the dinner table.

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| Posted On Oct 29, 2012 | By:

Feeling SAD? It’s That Time of The Year

Do you feel like your energy level declines significantly and you have the urge to sleep more starting in the late fall?  Or do you feel irritable or blue, or crave sweets and gain weight like clockwork starting every year around this time?  If so, you probably suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a condition that affects millions worldwide.  It is especially prevalent in individuals who live in northern latitudes, and tends to affect women and children more than men.

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| Posted On Oct 24, 2012 | By:

Do you know what your Mesopic Vision is? You should!

This is a beautiful time in Massachusetts – the leaves are changing, pumpkins and mums are appearing in many yards and on many porches, and color is everywhere. The change of season also brings with it a change in the amount of daylight, which most of us view with a bit of melancholy.  But this change in daylight brings possible dangers that many of us do not realize.

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| Posted On Oct 12, 2012 | By:

You’re Not Alone: Breast Cancer Support and Resources

The month of October and the color pink are closely associated with breast cancer awareness month. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 268,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in the US during 2019. Excluding can­cers of the skin, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. At this time there are more than 3.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States.

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| Posted On Sep 17, 2012 | By:

What is Urinary Stress Incontinence?

Urinary stress incontinence is defined as unintentional urine leakage caused by some kind of physical activity or movement, such as laughing, coughing, sneezing, exercising, or heavy lifting.  These movements place pressure or stress on the bladder and cause urine to leak out.  You may not experience incontinence every time you laugh or sneeze, for example, but any activity that increases pressure on your bladder, particularly when it is full, can cause the unintentional loss of urine.

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| Posted On Sep 13, 2012 | By:

Frozen Shoulder

Have you had an annoying pain in your shoulder for weeks or months, but you cannot recall injuring yourself?  Are you unable to enjoy sports like tennis or golf because the pain and stiffness in your shoulder is getting worse? Is the pain beginning to keep you awake at night?  If any of this sounds familiar, you may have frozen shoulder.

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| Posted On Aug 29, 2012 | By:

Diabulimia: a Dangerous Eating Disorder

The promise of quick weight loss is appealing to many, especially young women who are concerned with their appearance.  Often, the quest for a thin body and an obsession with food can lead to eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia.  When an individual with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes develops an eating disorder, the result can be downright deadly.

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| Posted On Aug 22, 2012 | By:

Why your Back to School checklist should include an eye exam

According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), most of a child’s learning occurs through use of his or her eyes.  School activities – reading, writing, sports, play, and the use of technology like smart boards, desktop PCs and tablets, to name only a few – place many demands on a child’s vision.

Moreover, different activities place different requirements on a child’s vision: some tasks require children to view things very close to them,

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| Posted On Jul 27, 2012 | By:

Organic, Natural and Everything Else: Decoding the Food Labels

Research on food trends in the United States indicates that Americans have a growing appetite for healthier foods.  According to the Institute of Food Technologists, most consumers believe that limiting processed food is one of the most important components of healthier eating, and natural ingredients rank third on the list of most looked-for items on the ingredient label, after type of fat/oil and sweeteners.

Stroll through any grocery store and you’ll see an ever-increasing number of natural and organic foods,

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