Fertility

| Posted On Apr 01, 2016 | By:

Fertility Does Decline with Age…but There Are Options

I recently had a conversation with my 90-year-old grandmother—who had given birth to 4 children between the ages of 23 and 30 years old. She asked me what the average age of my patients was. When I replied that the average age was 37, her surprised response back to me was, “You can help a 37 year old get pregnant?!” Thankfully, the answer is a resounding yes!

As a fertility doctor,

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| Posted On Aug 21, 2014 | By:

Better Care for a Better Life: Paula

After Paula and her husband Chris had their son Grayson three years ago, they struggled to get pregnant again. After months of frustration and a very emotional period in their lives, Paula and Chris turned to Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and Dr. Christine Skiadas, a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist and a subspecialist in reproductive endocrinology and infertility in our Fertility and Reproductive Health Department, to get to the bottom of the problem and explore their options.

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| Posted On Jul 30, 2013 | By:

Understanding Male Infertility

Although having a problem conceiving can feel very isolating, fertility issues are common.  About one in six couples are unable to conceive after one year of trying.  About 30% of the time, a problem with the male partner’s fertility is the single contributing factor to the couple’s inability to conceive.

The good news is that many of these conditions are potentially reversible or respond well to treatment options. 

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| Posted On May 08, 2013 | By:

What to Say and Not to Say: Supporting a Friend or Family Member with Infertility

Family members and friends can unintentionally hurt the feelings of couples dealing with infertility. Although it may seem natural to ask couples when they plan to have children, even this question can be hurtful for some.  If you ask and don’t get a straight answer, drop the subject.  If a friend confides in you about fertility issues, listen without judgment.

Here is a “top five” list of things NOT to say or ask someone trying to get pregnant.

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| Posted On Dec 05, 2011 | By:

Anticipating the holiday season

For anyone in the midst of fertility treatment, the upcoming holidays can present challenges.  The holiday season provides more opportunities to socialize with friends and family, and therefore increases the potential for questions that, however well-intentioned, can make you uncomfortable.  Because the holidays are often family-focused celebrations, the most difficult part of the season may actually be dealing with your own family.   It’s helpful to anticipate the events and prepare ahead of time for situations which may be stressful for you. 

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| Posted On Aug 12, 2011 | By:

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine problem – it is caused by a hormone imbalance in the body – as well as the most common cause of infertility in women.  PCOS affects 6.5 to 8 percent of women, and the prevalence is 3-4 times higher in overweight or obese women, as weight gain is a symptom of PCOS.  It is important to know that PCOS is a syndrome, not a disease,

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| Posted On Apr 25, 2011 | By:

When trying to conceive “the old-fashioned way” may not be enough

Babies!  It seems as though they’re everywhere and that a different friend or relative calls you every week to announce her pregnancy.  If you’re “trying” and it hasn’t happened yet, it’s easy to feel alone, but you’re not.  

The majority of people trying to conceive will do so in the first six months of trying, but up to 1 in 6 couples will have difficulty conceiving (meaning not achieving a pregnancy in one year of unprotected intercourse). 

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| Posted On Apr 11, 2011 | By:

Planning for Baby

Have you and your spouse or partner decided you’re ready to have a baby?  It’s exciting to think about, that’s for certain.  Before getting caught up in the excitement of trying to conceive, however, you should think about planning a trip to your doctor. Seeing your doctor before you get pregnant provides an opportunity to make sure that you’re as healthy as possible—and it allows you to test for certain conditions that might affect your pregnancy (even before it happens).

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